Nutrition

As described in Northern Health’s Position on healthy eating (PDF), healthy eating is getting enough nutritious and tasty food for daily living and wellness. Healthy eating is about more than just food choices; it includes food, nutrition, eating competence, culture and tradition, food systems, and food security.

Learn about nutrition for lifelong health

Access a dietitian

Are you looking for support from a dietitian? Explore the sections below to learn about how to access a dietitian in Northern Health.

There are also Dietitian Services at HealthLink BC. Call 8-1-1 (or 1-604-215-8110 in some Northern communities) and ask to speak with a dietitian, or email a HealthLink BC Dietitian.

Population health

Population health dietitians work to build capacity, facilitate connections with local and regional resources, and support policies to promote food security and healthy eating for northern populations. They focus on:

  • Community food security
  • Food and nutrition across the lifespan
  • Health promoting food environments (i.e. childcare settings, schools)
  • Household food insecurity
  • Weight-inclusive approaches to health

These dietitians work with a variety of partners, including Northern Health staff, health professionals, community groups, organizations, and local governments.

How to contact a population health dietitian

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Hospital inpatient

In hospitals, dietitians work to improve nutrition and health by working with patients, caregivers, and the healthcare team. Dietitians may work with patients for reasons such as:

  • Chewing and swallowing problems
  • Chronic disease management
  • Malnutrition
  • Poor wound healing
  • Post-surgery

Dietitians are part of the care team, and may provide specialized nutrition advice, recommendations for tube feeds or IV nutrition, etc. Before discharge from hospital, dietitians provide nutrition education and link patients, families and caregivers to resources in their communities.

How to get a referral

If you, or a loved one, are receiving care in a hospital and are concerned about nutritional health, ask the health care team for a referral to see a dietitian.

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Long-term care

In long-term care facilities, dietitians work to improve residents’ nutrition, health, and quality of life by working with residents, their caregivers, and the healthcare team.

Residents may receive a nutrition assessment and follow-up plan from a dietitian.

How to get a referral

Dietitians are available at many long-term care facilities. If you are concerned about your loved one’s nutrition risk, or have concerns about their eating or swallowing, ask the health care team how to connect with the dietitian.

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Primary care and outpatient

As part of the health care team, dietitians work with clients of all ages and their families and caregivers. They provide nutrition assessment, counselling, and self-management support to help clients address their health and eating-related concerns, including:

  • Chewing and swallowing problems
  • Chronic diseases such as diabetes, liver, heart, lung or kidney disease
  • Eating disorders and disordered eating
  • Food allergies and intolerances, digestive disorders
  • Growth or eating concerns in kids
  • Malnutrition
  • Tube feeding

Primary care dietitians may also work on health promotion and prevention, and may collaborate with community agencies.

How to get a referral

If you or a loved one have a nutrition-related medical condition or concern, and would like to see a dietitian, speak to your health care team about your options, or see below for information about services in or near your community.

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Community services available

See specific communities listed below for available primary care and outpatient dietitian services.

Burns Lake

Health professional referral required.

Also offers community events, presentations, and grocery store tours.

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Chetwynd

Health professional referral preferred.

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Dawson Creek

Health professional referral preferred.

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Fort Nelson

Self-referral or health professional referral.

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Fort St. James

Health professional referral preferred.

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Fort St. John

Outpatient dietitian

Self-referral or health professional referral.

Diabetes Education Centre

Self-referral or health professional referral.

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Fraser Lake

Referral from health professional preferred.

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Haida Gwaii

Daajing Giids Llnagaay (Queen Charlotte)

Self-referral or health professional referral.

Gaw (Masset)

Self-referral or health professional referral.

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Houston

Self-referral or health professional referral.

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Hudson’s Hope

Self-referral or health professional referral.

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Kitimat

Self-referral or health professional referral. Contact the Kitimat Living Well Program.

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Mackenzie

Health professional referral required.

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Prince George

Diabetes Education Centre

Self-referral or health professional referral for adults. Pediatrician referral required for infants, children and youth under 18.

Eating Disorders Program

Referral from doctor required.

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Prince Rupert

Health professional referral required.

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Quesnel

Health professional referral required.

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Smithers

Self-referral or health professional referral.

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Terrace

Self-referral or health professional referral.

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Tumbler Ridge

Health professional referral preferred.

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Vanderhoof

Health professional referral preferred.

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